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Related Topics: Agile Software Development, Microsoft Developer

Book Review

Book Review: Adaptive Code via C#

Agile coding with design patterns and SOLID principles

I have seen a lot of Scrum projects flop and flop hard. There are so many IT shops that look at the little iterative Scrum diagram and think, "well that looks easy enough", and they are off and running. Regretfully they don't understand that Scrum is just a process, and a development process is only as good as the team you've assembled.

In real world development project's processes should be tailored for a given project. Allowing you to account for your team's skills and availability, your business's needs, the tools you have available, the environment you are working in, the difficulty of the solution, the working environment - team member locations, greenfield vs. brownfield development, and many more things that are usually not taken into consideration when a project is started.

I have seen projects fail for any of the above factors not being handled correctly. I usually see projects fail for multiple reasons. Lack of architecture, managers that have no business managing, business owners who want to over step the boundary that exists between the decisions we need them to make and the technical decisions they need to leave to the technical team, and of course the one this book addresses, inexperienced developers.

After a short introduction the author takes us on a tour of Scrum. I really liked that the author stayed grounded in reality during the tour and at the end of it brings us back to the topic he is covering, quality code. The book is broken down into 3 parts. I have listed each along with the chapters they contain.

PART I AN AGILE FOUNDATION
CHAPTER 1 Introduction to Scrum
CHAPTER 2 Dependencies and layering
CHAPTER 3 Interfaces and design patterns
CHAPTER 4 Unit testing and refactoring

PART II WRITING SOLID CODE
CHAPTER 5 The single responsibility principle
CHAPTER 6 The open/closed principle
CHAPTER 7 The Liskov substitution principle
CHAPTER 8 Interface segregation
CHAPTER 9 Dependency injection

PART III ADAPTIVE SAMPLE
CHAPTER 10 Adaptive sample: Introduction
CHAPTER 11 Adaptive sample: Sprint 1
CHAPTER 12 Adaptive sample: Sprint 2

Appendix A: Adaptive tools
Appendix B: GitHub code samples online

Very few developers take the time to learn the coding principles, practices, and patterns found in this book. The author has done the development community a great service by assembling all these topics and one book. Prior to this book you could still learn all these techniques, but you would have to go looking for them in different books and locations on the Internet.

There were some books that covered all these topics in the past but they were much more difficult to get through. The author's writing style really helps absorb this material. This book also uses C# so .NET developers should feel right at home. The books I am referring to used Java, C, or C++.

Agile coding techniques in this book are not optional. They are a key piece of the puzzle in a shop or on a project that is attempting to run with agile processes.

Keep in mind that agile is a state of being, not a process, not a set of development practices, not a way of budgeting, and not an architecture. All those things must be done in a certain way in order to achieve an agile state on a project.

Adaptive Code via C#: Agile coding with design patterns and SOLID principles does a great job of showing the developer how to achieve their part of the puzzle that are needed to create an agile environment.

Another book that just came out, Microsoft .NET - Architecting Applications for the Enterprise (2nd Edition), does an excellent job of showing the architect how to achieve their part of the many pieces of the puzzle that are needed to create an agile environment.

Absolutely buy both, but developers should start here, and architects should start with Microsoft .NET - Architecting Applications for the Enterprise (2nd Edition).

There are very few books that assemble and present the amount of important material as this one. It is an absolute must read for every .NET software architect and developer.

Adaptive Code via C#: Agile coding with design patterns and SOLID principles

Adaptive Code via C#: Agile coding with design patterns and SOLID principles

More Stories By Tad Anderson

Tad Anderson has been doing Software Architecture for 18 years and Enterprise Architecture for the past few.